Monday, January 23, 2017

White Girl's Block Party: The State of the Women's March Los Angeles


Ok, so Los Angeles had a block party this past weekend. Everyone was invited, sorta!

Here's an uncomfortable truth, considering that Los Angeles ranks pretty high in diversity among U.S. cities. White people only make up a little over a quarter of the population. Yet, the woman’s march was overwhelmingly white. I know I'm extrapolating here because a lot of people came in from surrounding areas but you get where I’m going, right? With about 670 sister marches around the world, the women’s march in DTLA felt and looked like a white girl's block party. In what is estimated at 750,000 attendees, nonwhite women’s perspectives didn’t seem to be represented - at least not visually.

There were signs and hats, holding hands but it felt a far cry from women who truly felt their rights were being violated. They were lining up for lattes (seriously, I was in the line behind them) and stopping at Bottega for macaroons. Definitely not the vibe you would think appropriate for any group of people that are worried, afraid or angry that they may be losing their human rights. I definitely didn’t see Black Lives Matter marchers stopping for brunch.

Now, we’ve all seen angry women - angry white women, angry black women, angry asian women and angry latin women. You name it. When women are pissed, everyone clears the fuck out of the way.  So much of a good time that men were invited and kids didn’t have to cover their ears. Well, there was Madonna…but that's a whole other can of worms. 


My point is these women were having a really good time. It’s not only the lack of diversity that bothered me the most about the march but also the lack of focus. When I use the word “party” I’m not just teasing. I think Amber Roses’ Slut-Walk had more of an identifiable, action-oriented singular, inclusive message than the women’s march. Now, where’s my tea? 

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authorHi. I’m Daisi. I’m a creative media personality (Modelpreneur) who’s helping more people understand the relationship between media and culture. My focus is on social media specifically (i.e. technology, communication, etc.); and how they impact culture and society.



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